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20110301
20110331
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KPIX (CBS) 7
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living within 120 miles of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on ame
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
mean fewer trains and buses. a cbs news investigation-- u.s. guns sold to mexican drug cartels in full view of the a.t.f. now allegations it's gone on longer and involved more weapons than anyone realized. and winning for wes. a team rallies around the memory of its fallen star. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for weeks opposition forces made significant progress in their fight against libya's moammar qaddafi, seizing key cities in the east. but the tide may be turning. today qaddafi's air force fired on the oil town of ras lanuf dozens, many of them civilians, were wounded in the barrage. president obama spoke by phone with british prime minister david cameron. both agree all options are on the table, including the imposition of a no-fly zone to ground libya's air force. qaddafi made a surprise appearance in a tripoli hotel where foreign reporters have been staying and just outside the capital, his voices battled to retake zawiyah from the rebels who have been
their sites on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to
another. >> reporter: but republicans say a spike in u.s. jihadist terror plots justify their focus. between may of 2009 and november, 2010, arrests were made for 22 such plots-- more than in the previous seven years combined. >> there is that small element in the community that's radicalizing. >> reporter: poisoning the atmosphere was king's own past assertion-- that most u.s. mosques are run by radicals. >> cleaning a dirty kitchen you can't clean it with dirty water. >> reporter: king is from long island and his relations with muslim leaders there deteriorated after 9/11. >> we have some serious concerns because congressman king has been a muslim barber. >> reporter: keith ellison, one of two muslim congressmen, broke down as he recalled a paramedic killed on 9/11 who was later smeared because of his muslim faith. >> his life should not be identify as just a member of the ethnic group or just a member of a religion. >> reporter: despite the tension, king called this his happiest day. >> i challenge anyone to find anything that was improper about today's hearing. >> reporter: in f
's problems alone, but they are important to us. they're problems worth solving. >> mitchell: i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, new fears in japan. highly radioactive water is leaking from the fukushima plant and plutonium has been found in the soil. plus, she preys on child couples. cbs news tracks down a con artist making thousands in an adoption scam. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> mitchell: good evening. welcome to a special western edition of the "cbs evening news." president obama made his case for military intervention in libya tonight, telling the american people he did it to prevent a massacre in benghazi. he said once again that u.s. involvement would be limited, with coalition allies taking over command of the operation. chip reid is at the white house tonight with more on the president's speech. chip, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, russ. the president said he refused to wait for images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action in libya. >> when our interests and
't predict how long the operation will last, he did say the u.s. could transfer control of it to allied by saturday. meanwhile, house speaker boehner wrote to president obama today to complain that the mission's goals are not clearly defined. more now from mark phillips in tripoli. >> reporter: day five of the bombing campaign over libya and the combined coalition air forces have declared something like victory. >> their air force no longer exists as a fighting force. to the point that we can operat. >> reporter: control of the skies has led to near control on the ground, as moammar qaddafi's forces have learned. and as the bombing has continued, the brave face of the regime is showing some worry lines. instead of rambling on for hours as he often does, moammar qaddafi's latest pep rally's speech lasted a brief three minutes. out in public is a risky place for him to be these days. and where the obedient cheering crowds once numbered in tens of thousands, now they are often down to a few hundred, sometimes to mere dozens. even the regime's once p.r. machine is grinding down. today after
. today that only seemed to enrage the rebels more. "qaddafi you coward, meet us in the battlefield" these men are shouting as they stand in a bomb-blast crater. the rebels are hoping for a no-fly zone, but in the meantime this man and his friends want to knock qaddafi's warplanes out of the sky with surface-to-air missiles. "i trained for a couple of days and it's not hard to use it" he told us. the lightly-trained rebels have run into trouble in the last few days. down the road, government forces have retaken the town. state t.v. showed these pictures and this chilling statement by a qaddafi supporter. >> ( translated ): yesterday we killed you in jawad, today we killed you in ras lanuf, tomorrow we will kill you in everywhere in libya. >> reporter: underlying the message, images of captured rebels face down on the ground. the clearest sign yet that this conflict has reached a dangerous new stage. mandy clark, cbs news, ras lanuf libya. >> couric: the triple in libya has caused the price of gas here to soar. it's now up to an average of $3.52 a gallon. still, that's more than 50 c
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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